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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Elizabeth H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, Bethia H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBurgess, Edwin R. IVen_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-12T14:14:36Z
dc.date.available2021-10-12T14:14:36Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationTaylor EH, King BH, Burgess ER IV. 2021. Diet and nutrition of adult Spalangia cameroni (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a parasitoid of filth flies. Environmental Entomology 1-15. doi.org/10.1093/ee/nvab113en_US
dc.identifier.otherdoi: 10.1093/ee/nvab113
dc.identifier.urihttps://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/24302
dc.description.abstractMost parasitoid wasps parasitize herbivorous insects, so nectar from flowers is readily available. However, parasitoid wasps are also an important component of the rich invertebrate communities at livestock facilities in large accumulations of manure, where flowers are largely absent. Little is known about adult parasitoid diet and nutrition in these communities. The present study examined this in Spalangia cameroni, a pupal parasitoid of filth flies. Like many parasitoid wasps, S. cameroni feed on host fluids, and in the laboratory readily feed on honey or a sucrose solution, which increases their longevity. Here adult longevity in the presence of six potential food sources, bovine manure, sorghum silage, bovine milk, buckwheat inflorescence (Polygonaceae), sweet alyssum inflorescence (Brassicaceae), or dandelion inflorescence (Asteraceae), was compared to that with water or honey. Only parasitoids given buckwheat lived as long as parasitoids given honey, and parasitoids given honey or buckwheat lived longer than parasitoids given water. Parasitoids readily ate buckwheat nectar, avoiding pollen grains. Diet affected the amount of free sugars, glycogen, and lipids in complex ways. Compared to parasitoids that were given just water, parasitoids with access to honey or sucrose had higher sugar and glycogen levels, but not detectably higher lipid levels. Access to buckwheat had no detectable effect on a parasitoid’s free sugar, glycogen, or lipid levels; however, then after 4 d with just water, sugar levels were lower and glycogen levels were higher compared to parasitoids that had been given access to only water the entire time.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectadult dieten_US
dc.subjectanthroneen_US
dc.subjectbiocontrolen_US
dc.subjectbuckwheaten_US
dc.subjectconservationen_US
dc.subjectlongevityen_US
dc.subjectnectaren_US
dc.subjectparasitoiden_US
dc.titleDiet and nutrition of adult Spalangia cameroni (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a parasitoid of filth fliesen_US
dc.type.genreArticleen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen_US


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