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dc.contributor.advisorSalehinia, Imanen_US
dc.contributor.authorSnyder, Alexander D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-26T20:24:17Z
dc.date.available2019-11-26T20:24:17Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/21171
dc.descriptionAdvisors: Iman Salehinia.en_US
dc.descriptionCommittee members: John Shelton; Sahar Vahabzadeh.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of hydroxyapatite (HAP) as a bioactive scaffold and implant coating material has grown with recent advances in tissue engineering and biomaterial design. It is known that computational material design via hierarchical structuring offers reduced cost and increased material performance. The goal of understanding of material behavior and underlying causes across multiple time and length scales offers distinct advantages over traditional experimental material processing and analysis at each scale. To date, no work has been performed which specifically addresses the nanoscale deformation mechanisms of bulk hydroxyapatite or the effects of common defects on its mechanical behavior. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted in LAMMS with OVITO for post processing to determine the involvement of bond species in different loading cases. The effects of strain rate, temperature, vacancy pairs, and porosity on the mechanical properties of the crystal were also qualified.en_US
dc.format.extentxvii, 156 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherNorthern Illinois Universityen_US
dc.rightsNIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEngineeringen_US
dc.subject.lcshMaterials scienceen_US
dc.subject.lcshMechanical engineeringen_US
dc.titleNanoscale deformation mechanisms in bulk hexagonal hydroxyapatite and effect of defects on mechanical propertiesen_US
dc.type.genreDissertation/Thesisen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S. (Master of Science)en_US


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