Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCaffrey, Colinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-23T18:10:54Z
dc.date.available2019-10-23T18:10:54Z
dc.date.issued2010-07
dc.identifier.citationColin Caffrey, Can a Computer Read a Doctor's Mind? Whether Using Data Mining as Proof in Healthcare Fraud Cases is Consistent with the Law of Evidence, 30 N. Ill. U. L. Rev. 509 (2010).en_US
dc.identifier.issn0734-1490
dc.identifier.urihttps://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/20524
dc.description.abstractHealthcare fraud is a growing problem in the United States. Data mining is increasingly being used to combat it. After briefly explaining data mining, this article analyzes whether evidence obtained by data mining is admissible in court under the laws of evidence. It then examines the issue under both the Federal Rules of Evidence and the common law. This article focuses on three key questions: (1) Whether the use of prior acts by practitioners is proper under the law of evidence? (2) Is testimony based on data mining proper expert testimony? and (3) Does the methodology of data mining satisfy the Daubert or Frye standard?en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNorthern Illinois University Law Reviewen_US
dc.subjecthealthcareen_US
dc.subjecthealth careen_US
dc.subjectfrauden_US
dc.subjectdata miningen_US
dc.subjectFederal Rules of Evidenceen_US
dc.subjectexpert testimonyen_US
dc.titleCan a Computer Read a Doctor's Mind? Whether Using Data Mining as Proof in Healthcare Fraud Cases is Consistent with the Law of Evidenceen_US
dc.type.genreArticleen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentOtheren_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record