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dc.contributor.authorTang, Yihui (Elina)en_US
dc.contributor.authorHinsch, Christianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-30T17:12:25Z
dc.date.available2019-09-30T17:12:25Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/20497
dc.description.abstractMaterialism and environmentalism have emerged as megatrends in developed western societies. Prior research has suggested that these two values are incompatible. The current research shows that materialistic values can strengthen the positive relationship between environmental knowledge and environmental behaviors under certain conditions. The results suggest moral compensation as the underlying cause. Across four studies, this research uses experimental, survey, and secondary data to show that materialistic values can have a positive impact on indirect environmental behaviors when an individual possesses sufficient environmental knowledge. This effect is stronger in individuals who are highly self-conscious as well as those primed to be self-conscious, consistent with the moral compensation paradigm. In summary, the impact of environmental attitudes on environmental behaviors through environmental knowledge is most pronounced when one's materialistic values and self-consciousness are high. Conceptual, policy-making, and managerial implications are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental attitudeen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental behavioren_US
dc.subjectenvironmental knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectmaterialismen_US
dc.subjectmoral compensationen_US
dc.subjectself-consciousnessen_US
dc.titleGoing green to be morally clean: An examination of environmental behavior among materialistic consumersen_US
dc.type.genreArticleen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Marketingen_US
dc.rights.statementIn Copyrighten_US


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