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dc.contributor.advisorParham, Ellen S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJoksimovic, Mary Louen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-26T17:27:45Z
dc.date.available2016-02-26T17:27:45Z
dc.date.issued1990
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/15733
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractStudies that have focused on health behaviors such as weight control and smoking cessation have provided little information about population groups that are not associated with clinical programs. If treatment programs only see those who ask for help, what about the rest? The purpose of this study was to determine which factors are associated with success in making health-related behavior changes, and whether or not nutrition-related professionals differ from nonhealth-related professionals in their success with making changes. Two hundred eighty-six professionals responded to a questionnaire in a midwestern state. The sample included 219 women and 67 men. Participants were classified as health care professionals (N=91), non-health care professionals (N=137), or non-health care professionals with training in health or nutrition (N=58). Respondents reported their height, and present, highest, and lowest adult weights. From these, body mass index (kg/m2) was calculated, and subjects were classified by weight history. Thirty- three percent of the health professionals and 28 percent of the nonhealth care professionals who had ever been overweight successfully lost weight. The greatest degree of success was in smoking cessation. Only 26 (9%) of the total indicated that they were currently smokers, and 24 percent of these who had once smoked were still smokers. Sixty-two percent of the 151 subjects who reported attempting to change other health-related behaviors were successful in doing so. Of the lifestyle characteristics examined by the study - weight control, smoking, and exercise - only the incidence of exercise was found to be statistically different among the three professional groups. Respondents indicated that their most frequent concern was the need for more exercise.en_US
dc.format.extentvi, 53 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherNorthern Illinois Universityen_US
dc.rightsNIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBehavior modificationen_US
dc.subject.lcshHealth--Psychological aspectsen_US
dc.titleFactors associated with success in health-related behavior changesen_US
dc.type.genreDissertation/Thesisen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Human and Family Resourcesen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S. (Master of Science)en_US


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