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dc.contributor.advisorHannagan, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeyer, Meganen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-01T16:15:13Z
dc.date.available2015-10-01T16:15:13Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/13918
dc.description.abstractAre politicians who show contempt less likely to attract support from voters? In this project we tested this question using a laboratory experiment. 37 students were recruited from undergraduate courses at NIU. Participants viewed video clips of politicians (both signaling contempt and more neutral emotions), respond to a number of survey quesitons. The emotions signaled in the stimulus videos were FACS coded. Although statistical significance was not achieved, the results were in the hypothesized direction, indicating that politicians were perceived more negatively when contemptuous compared to when facially neutral.en_US
dc.format.extent25 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNorthern Illinois Universityen_US
dc.rightsNIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.en_US
dc.subjectelectionen_US
dc.subjectcontempten_US
dc.subjectpsychologyen_US
dc.subjectpolitical scienceen_US
dc.titleCan Contempt Cost You an Election?en_US
dc.type.genreDissertation/Thesisen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Political Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreeB.A. (Bachelor of Arts)en_US


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