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dc.contributor.advisorBruno, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.authorStriegel, Markieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-11T14:28:27Z
dc.date.available2015-06-11T14:28:27Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/13719
dc.description.abstractThis research examines the different representations of imperial women by two ancient Roman historians, Plutarch and Tacitus. While both historians wrote during the period from 60-117 C.E., their different positions within Roman imperial life affected their views of the empire and its people. I will argue that their individual ideas about morality and the Roman Empire contributed to their divergent depictions and descriptions. By analyzing each historian’s own ideals, the historical context in which they wrote, and the varied scholarship regarding Roman imperial women, I hope to contribute a significant and original argument to this discussion. This comparative approach of two of Roman history’s most influential writers will be integral to understanding more about imperial women during the Roman Empire.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNorthern Illinois Universityen_US
dc.rightsNIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.en_US
dc.subjectimperial womenen_US
dc.subjectPlutarchen_US
dc.subjectTacitusen_US
dc.subjectRoman Empireen_US
dc.subject60-117 C.E.en_US
dc.titleThe Differing Representations of Imperial Women by Plutarch and Tacitusen_US
dc.type.genreConference Posteren_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Historyen_US
dc.description.degreeB.A. (Bachelor of Arts)en_US


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