Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAtkins, E. Taylor, 1967--en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-07T15:59:19Z
dc.date.available2021-06-07T15:59:19Z
dc.date.issued2021-06-01
dc.identifier.issn1554-3749
dc.identifier.urihttps://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/23075
dc.description.abstractNowhere in the colonial world was intra-imperial competition in association football (soccer) more common than that between imperial Japan and colonial Korea. Korean sides won an impressive 73% of their matches against Japanese between 1926 and 1942. If the Tokyo-based Japan Football Association (of which the Korea Football Association was a regional affiliate) was the organizational center of the sport within the empire, in terms of quality play the peninsula displaced it. This article argues that although football competition certainly reflected nationalist animosities, it also exemplified what imperial integration (naisen ittai) was supposed to look like. Football was one area in which Koreans and Japanese could and did collaborate on terms of relative parity. Though it was certainly a venue for expressing nationalist animosities, the football pitch was also a liminal, meritocratic space, in which ethno-national animosities were temporarily suspended.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherStudies on Asiaen_US
dc.subjectJapanen_US
dc.subjectKoreaen_US
dc.subjectFootball/socceren_US
dc.subjectColonialismen_US
dc.subjectHistory of sporten_US
dc.title“Enemy Soldiers” and “Ball Mates”: Intra-Imperial Football and Identity Politics in Interwar Northeast Asiaen_US
dc.type.genreArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Historyen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record