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dc.contributor.authorBurton, James P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoobler, Jenny M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKernan, Mary C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-06T11:25:31Z
dc.date.available2018-12-06T11:25:31Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationBurton, J.P., Hoobler, J.M., & Kernan, M.C. (2011). When research setting is important: The influence of subordinate self-esteem on reactions to abusive supervision. Organization Management Journal, 8: 139-150.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/19271
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we argue that the conflicting theoretical views regarding the role that self-esteem plays in the decision to become aggressive can be explained by the particular research methodology used. Specifically, we examine how individuals respond to a perceived abusive supervisor in two settings: 1) using scenarios and 2) in a field study. Results indicate that individuals with high self-esteem are more likely to become aggressive in response to an abusive supervisor in settings where they are asked what they would do (using scenarios). However, in field research settings, where they are asked what they did do, individuals with low self-esteem were more likely to become aggressive in response to an abusive supervisor.en_US
dc.publisherOrganization Management Journalen_US
dc.subjectself-esteemen_US
dc.subjectworkplace aggressionen_US
dc.subjectabusive supervisionen_US
dc.titleWhen Research Setting is Important: The Influence of Subordinate Self-Esteem on Reactions to Abusive Supervisionen_US
dc.type.genreArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Managementen_US


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