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dc.contributor.authorCowen, Joshen_US
dc.contributor.authorCreed, Benjaminen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-03T16:42:17Z
dc.date.available2018-12-03T16:42:17Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-27
dc.identifier.other10.1177/2332858417731555
dc.identifier.urihttps://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/19244
dc.description.abstractIn this article, we focus on a statewide system of interdistrict open enrollment in Michigan, known as Schools of Choice. Our previous work indicated that students who take advantage of this program are disproportionately lower performing on state exams, come from lower-income families, and are more likely to be minority students. We estimated conditional bounds on these factors, as well as within-student variation in test scores, for the effect of participation in Schools of Choice, and find little evidence that student achievement is affected overall. We find little consistent evidence that subgroups of students based on race, gender or income benefit or lose disproportionately from the program, nor do students whose resident districts vary on key demographic or achievement characteristics.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this project provided in part by the Walton Family Foundation (Cowen) and the Institute of Education Sciences at the U.S Department of Education (Creed).en_US
dc.subjectschool choiceen_US
dc.subjectopen enrollmenten_US
dc.subjectevaluationen_US
dc.titlePublic School Choice and Student Achievement: Evidence From Michigan’s Interdistrict Open Enrollment Systemen_US
dc.type.genreArticleen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Leadership, Educational Psychology, and Foundations (LEPF)en_US


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