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dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Stephenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-11T21:38:32Z
dc.date.available2018-09-11T21:38:32Z
dc.date.issued2013-02
dc.identifier.citationStephen Hoffman, Is Torture Justified in Terrorism Cases?: Comparing U.S. and European Views, 33 N. Ill. U. L. Rev. 379 (2013).en_US
dc.identifier.issn0734-1490
dc.identifier.urihttps://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/18504
dc.description.abstractPopular opinion regarding torture has changed significantly in the wake of 9/11 and subsequent terrorist attacks, with people in affected countries generally becoming more accepting of it as an interrogation tactic. This increase is especially notable where the torture of a few can save the lives of many, particularly where there is little time to pursue other, less-invasive means of interrogation—the so-called “ticking bomb” scenario. This Article discusses three key ethical theories of torture and compares the legal status of torture in the United States and the European Union, concluding that circumstances may require its use when necessary to save many lives.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNorthern Illinois University Law Reviewen_US
dc.titleIs Torture Justified in Terrorism Cases?: Comparing U.S. and European Viewsen_US
dc.type.genreArticleen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentOtheren_US


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