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dc.contributor.authorFalkoff, Marc D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-01T13:31:20Z
dc.date.available2018-03-01T13:31:20Z
dc.date.issued2008-03
dc.identifier.citationMark D. Falkoff, Guantánamo in the Supreme Court: Welcome Back, Welcome Back, Welcome Back, The Professor's Column, March 2008.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/17854
dc.description.abstractBoumediene v. Bush is the latest of the Guantánamo detainee cases to make it to our nation’s highest court, and it will be the third time that the Justices take a metaphorical tour of Guantánamo in order to sort out some fundamental issues concerning our country’s dedication to the rule of law in the age of terror. What’s the issue in Boumediene? In simplest terms, the case is a challenge to the constitutionality of the Military Commissions Act, a statute in which Congress stripped the federal courts of the power to hear habeas corpus petitions that were filed years ago by prisoners at Guantánamo. None of these petitioners have been convicted of anything, and none have even been charged with a crime. In fact, the Pentagon has made it clear that most of these men never will be charged with anything.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNorthern Illinois University College of Lawen_US
dc.subjectGuantánamoen_US
dc.subjectU.S. Supreme Courten_US
dc.subjectBoumediene v. Bushen_US
dc.subjectMilitary Commissions Acten_US
dc.subjecthabeas corpusen_US
dc.titleGuantánamo in the Supreme Court: Welcome Back, Welcome Back, Welcome Backen_US
dc.type.genreEssayen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Lawen_US


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