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dc.contributor.authorKasambira Fannin, D., 1974--en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-09T18:18:35Z
dc.date.available2018-01-09T18:18:35Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/17844
dc.description.abstractClinicians facilitate successful use of Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC). The most clinically competent providers, however, address needs that extend beyond technical AAC use to help clients experience full participation. This can only be achieved for all clients by considering individual cultural factors that affect their participation. This article describes how Personal and Environmental Factors of the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: Children & Youth Version (ICF-CY; WHO, 2007) encompass how cultural characteristics (e.g., family/ home, school, recreational, social, or spiritual) impact participation. The ICF-CY can provide a structured way for Speech-Language Pathologists to consider culture to maximize children’s full participation in activities.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPerspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groupsen_US
dc.relation.ispartof1(3);
dc.subjectICF-CYen_US
dc.subjectAACen_US
dc.subjectcultureen_US
dc.titleThe Intersection of Culture and ICF-CY Personal and Environmental Factors for Alternative and Augmentative Communicationen_US
dc.type.genreArticleen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Allied Health and Communicative Disordersen_US


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