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dc.contributor.authorSecker, Anneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-12T16:51:39Z
dc.date.available2017-05-12T16:51:39Z
dc.date.issued1977
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/17548
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this increasingly self-conscious society almost everyone craves self-definition. One of the chief justifications for the study of purely American literature or American history assumes that Americans are fundamentally different from other peoples. Such an assumption is generally accepted as valid and never questioned very seriously. Consequently, there has been, since the first settlements began in the “New World” over 400 years ago, an attempt to characterize exactly what makes this American, this new person in relationship to the world, different from his European counterparts. The quest for the definition of an American character has involved many questions—What are Americans’ basic traits? How did we come to be the way we are? Has the character changed over time?en_US
dc.format.extent46 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNorthern Illinois Universityen_US
dc.rightsNIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.en_US
dc.subjectEnglishen_US
dc.subjectAmerican literatureen_US
dc.subjectindividualismen_US
dc.titleIndividualism and conformity : their development and influence on the American characteren_US
dc.type.genreDissertation/Thesisen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Englishen_US
dc.description.degreeB.A. (Bachelor of Arts)en_US


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