Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFalkoff, Marc D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-14T19:51:24Z
dc.date.available2016-07-14T19:51:24Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationMarc D. Falkoff, Bagram, Boumediene, and Limited Government, 59 DePaul L. Rev. 851 (2010) (with Robert Knowles).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/16506
dc.description.abstractThe United States’ prison at Bagram Airbase in Afghanistan is the latest front in the battle over the extraterritorial reach of the Constitution. Habeas litigation on behalf of Bagram detainees has begun establishing how the writ of habeas corpus extends beyond U.S. territory to active war zones, and it has begun to refine the limits of presidential power in the war on terror. This Article explains why, as the courts wrestle with these issues, their foremost task should be to determine whether the Constitution authorizes the U.S. government to suspend the protections of the writ, rather than to discover whether detainees abroad possess a “right” to judicial review of the legality of their detentions. More broadly, we suggest that the U.S. Supreme Court’s new multifactor balancing test for determining the extraterritorial reach of the writ (announced in June 2008 in Boumediene v. Bush must be understood as embodying a limited government approach, rather than a rights-based approach, to defining the global reach of the Constitution.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectHabeas corpusen_US
dc.subjectBagram Air Force Baseen_US
dc.subjectDetaineesen_US
dc.subjectWar zoneen_US
dc.subjectBoumediene v. Bushen_US
dc.subjectU.S. Constitutionen_US
dc.titleBagram, Boumediene, and Limited Governmenten_US
dc.type.genreArticleen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Lawen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record