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dc.contributor.advisorKing, Sondraen_US
dc.contributor.authorAtterbury, Jennifer L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-05T14:48:46Z
dc.date.available2016-02-05T14:48:46Z
dc.date.issued1993
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/15337
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages [26]-29)en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of nutrition bulletins containing cognitive, behavioral, and attitudinal components on nutrition knowledge, food/nutrition attitudes, and fat intake behavior of senior high school students. One hundred and six students were surveyed using a pretest-posttest, treatment-control group design. The treatment groups received the nutrition bulletins in their health or home economics class, with the control groups receiving general health bulletins. The survey used consisted of three instruments: a fat intake scale, a food/nutrition attitude instrument, and a nutrition knowledge test. Student t-tests and chi square analyses comparing treatment and control groups' knowledge, attitude, and behavior scores at baseline revealed no significant differences between the groups. Results of stepwise multiple linear regressions indicate that the experimental group had significantly improved knowledge scores. No significant changes were observed in nutrition attitudes or fat intake behavior. Among demographic variables examined, results indicate younger students showed more positive knowledge gains than older students. Also, age and family history of heart disease were significant predictors of both fat intake behavior and selected nutrition attitudes. The attitude scale entitled Caring About Nutrition was also found to be a significant predictor of fat intake behavior.en_US
dc.format.extent85 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherNorthern Illinois Universityen_US
dc.rightsNIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHealth behavior in adolescenceen_US
dc.subject.lcshHuman behavior--Nutritional aspectsen_US
dc.subject.lcshHealth educationen_US
dc.subject.lcshNutrition--Psychological aspectsen_US
dc.titleThe effect of attitudinal and behavioral nutrition bulletins on adolescents' nutrition knowledge, attitudes, and fat intake behavioren_US
dc.type.genreDissertation/Thesisen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Human and Family Resourcesen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S. (Master of Science)en_US


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