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dc.contributor.advisorRussell, Susan Dianaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, Karenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-22T15:17:45Z
dc.date.available2016-01-22T15:17:45Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/15053
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages [169]-176)en_US
dc.description.abstractMany of the world’s fisheries are regulated by state-level management systems built upon the assumption that marine resources are open-access common property resources, thus susceptible to “tragedy of the commons” scenarios, e.g., overfishing. Maritime anthropologists question this basic assumption based on empirical evidence that local fisheries often regulate themselves through a variety of common property regimes. This study, based on fieldwork from May 1994 to July 1994, examines the folk management system of the Vigia Chico lobster cooperative in Punta Allen, Quintana Roo, Mexico. The campo system is a well-defined lobster fishing rights system based upon private sea ownership and governed by a set of formal rules created and enforced by local fishers. It was not initiated by the Mexican government, but by local lobster fishers in order to regulate artificial habitats (lobster shelters) introduced by Cuban fishers in the 1960s. In less than a generation, the fishers have divided the cooperative’s common fishing grounds into privately “owned” sea parcels or campos. This relatively quick privatization has created a new social organization of lobster fishing in which access to lobster resources are obtained by either owning campos (property rights) or becoming crew members in fishing groups (access rights). While the campo system appears to be an effective local system of fishing rights, the system is inequitable due to unequal access to campos.en_US
dc.format.extentix, 181 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherNorthern Illinois Universityen_US
dc.rightsNIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.en_US
dc.subject.lcshFisheries, Cooperative--Mexico--Managementen_US
dc.subject.lcshLobster fisheries--Mexico--Managementen_US
dc.titleFolk management and the CAMPO system : private sea ownership in a Mexican lobster cooperativeen_US
dc.type.genreDissertation/Thesisen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anthropologyen_US
dc.description.degreeM.A. (Master of Arts)en_US


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