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dc.contributor.authorPeck, Brittnieen_US
dc.contributor.authorManning, Jimmieen_US
dc.contributor.authorTri, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.authorSkrzypczynski, Dariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSummers, Morganen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrubb, Kayleighen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-11T18:35:57Z
dc.date.available2016-01-11T18:35:57Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationPeck, B., Manning, J., Tri, A., Skrzypczynski, D., Summers, M., & Grubb, K. (2016). What does it mean when people say they “had sex”? Connecting communication to behavior. In J. Manning, & C. M. Noland (Eds.), Contemporary studies of sexuality & communication: Theoretical and applied perspectives (pp. 3-13). Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781465270245
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/14870
dc.description.abstractWhat do people mean when they say they “had sex”? The most-cited study regarding what activities are communicated as having “had sex” is now over 20 years old. This chapter provides findings from a study that replicated the original study’s methods to provide an up-to-date understanding. An Internet survey completed by 380 women and 197 men from the United States was conducted. Results show that penile-vaginal intercourse was the sexual activity most likely to count as having “had sex,” with 97.4% of participants indicating it as sex. Other common sexual activities measured include penile-anal intercourse, oral-genital contact, and manual stimulation of genitals. The findings suggest many attitudes represented in the original survey have changed. Implications and future studies are offered.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherKendall Hunten_US
dc.titleWhat Do People Mean When They Say They “Had Sex”? Connecting Communication and Behavioren_US
dc.type.genreBook Chapteren_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Communicationen_US


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