Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLukaszuk, Judith
dc.contributor.authorPrawitz, Aimee D.
dc.contributor.authorSchultz, Theresa M.
dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Elisa
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-31T22:53:13Z
dc.date.available2014-01-31T22:53:13Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine. Volume 6, Issue 1, DOI: 10.2202/1553-3840.1297, October 2009en_US
dc.identifier.issn1553-3840
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/13603
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10843/13603
dc.description.abstractR-alpha lipoic acid (R-ALA) supplementation improves blood glucose in diabetic animals, but there have been no long-term clinical trials in humans testing its use for glucose control (HbA1c). This double-blind study pre-/post-test control group (PL) design sought to determine the effect of R-ALA on HbA1c. Twenty type-2 diabetics were randomly assigned to 200 mg capsules of R-ALA (n=13; 8M 5F) or PL (n=7; 2M 5F) 3 times daily, 30 minutes before meals (600 mg total) for 91 days. Samples were obtained for HbA1c at baseline and day 91. No significant differences between R-ALA and PL groups were found at baseline or day 91. However, three distinct reactions to the supplement were noted. The first group (n=3) responded to R-ALA with a >25% drop in HbA1c range from 6.1-12.5 to 6.2- 9.0 mg/dL and/or halved their anti-diabetic medication. The second group (n=5) had no change in HbA1c. The third group (n=5) had changes in medication or concurrent chronic adverse events that should have raised HbA1c, but did not beyond that of the placebo. Conclusions: Three months of R-ALA supplementation may lower HbA1c in a small number of individuals. However, to further confirm these findings, larger studies of longer duration are needed.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherDe Gruyteren_US
dc.subjectBlood sugaren_US
dc.subjectR-alpha lipoic aciden_US
dc.subjectHbAlcen_US
dc.titleEffects of R-Alpha Lipoic Acid on HbA1c, Lipids and Blood Pressure in Type-2 Diabetics: A Preliminary Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.altlocation.uridx.doi.org/10.2202/1553-3840.1297en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Family, Consumer, and Nutrition Sciences


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record