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dc.contributor.authorBridgett, David
dc.contributor.authorOddi, Kate
dc.contributor.authorLaake, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorMurdock, Kyle
dc.contributor.authorBachmann, Melissa
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-07T20:41:15Z
dc.date.available2013-11-07T20:41:15Z
dc.date.issued2013-02
dc.identifier.citationBridgett, D. J., Oddi, K. B., Laake, L. M., Murdock, K. M., & Bachmann, M. N. (2013). Integrating and differentiating aspects of self-regulation: Effortful control, executive functioning, and links to negative affectivity. Emotion, 13, 47-63: doi: 10.1037/a0029536en_US
dc.identifier.issn1528-3542
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/13571
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10843/13571
dc.description.abstractSub-disciplines within psychology frequently examine self-regulation from different frameworks despite conceptually similar definitions of constructs. In the current study, similarities and differences between effortful control, based on the psychobiological model of temperament (Rothbart, Derryberry, & Posner, 1994), and executive functioning are examined and empirically tested in three studies (N = 509). Structural equation modeling indicated that effortful control and executive functioning are strongly associated and overlapping constructs (Study 1). Additionally, results indicated that effortful control is related to the executive function of updating/monitoring information in working memory, but not inhibition (Studies 2 and 3). Study 3 also demonstrates that better updating/monitoring information in working memory and better effortful control were uniquely linked to lower dispositional negative affect, whereas the executive function of low/poor inhibition was uniquely associated with an increased tendency to express negative affect. Furthermore, dispositional negative affect mediated the links between effortful control and, separately, the executive function of updating/monitoring information in working memory and the tendency to express negative affect. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed, and a potential framework for guiding future work directed at integrating and differentiating aspects of self-regulation is suggested.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEmotion;
dc.subjectExecutive Functionen_US
dc.subjectEmotion Regulationen_US
dc.subjectTemperamenten_US
dc.subjectEffortful Controlen_US
dc.subjectNegative Affecten_US
dc.subjectWorking Memoryen_US
dc.subjectInhibitionen_US
dc.titleIntegrating and Differentiating Aspects of Self-Regulation: Effortful Control, Executive Functioning, and Links to Negative Affectivityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.altlocation.uriDOI: 10.1037/a0029536en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology


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