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dc.contributor.authorAshley, Sharon T.
dc.contributor.authorAshley, Walker S.
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-23T19:49:50Z
dc.date.available2013-01-23T19:49:50Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationAshley, S.T., and W.S. Ashley, 2008: "The Storm Morphology of Deadly Flooding Events in the United States." International Journal of Climatology, 28, 493-503.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0899-8418
dc.identifier.urihttp://commons.lib.niu.edu/handle/10843/13370
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10843/13370
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the synoptic and mesoscale environments associated with deadly flooding events in the United States from 1996 to 2005. A manual environment classification scheme, which includes analyses of surface charts, 500 hPa maps, and composite radar data (where available), is utilized to ascertain the primary ascent mechanisms and storm types producing these fatal flood events. Of the ten classifications in the scheme, the two most dominant ascent mechanisms associated with deadly floods include frontal boundaries (45%) and tropical systems (22%). Findings illustrate that mesoscale convective systems were responsible for 36% of the total number of flood fatalities over the period. The ten classifications are spatially and temporally analysed in order to assess region-specific risks associated with deadly flooding events.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherRoyal Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.subjectflooden_US
dc.subjectflash flooden_US
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.subjecthazardsen_US
dc.subjectstorm morphologyen_US
dc.titleThe Storm Morphology of Deadly Flooding Events in the United Statesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.altlocation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/joc.1554en_US
dc.altlocation.uriDepartment of Geography
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Geography


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